Candle Stick Visual Reference Guide

The most comprehensive references to Candle Stick Charts are outlined in the following books:
1. Charles Bulkowski – Encycolopedia of Candlestick Charts 
2.  Steve Nison – Japanese Candlestick Charting Techniques
3. Clive Lambert – Candlestick Charts

 

Abandoned Baby, Bullish: There will be a bullish pattern with an abandoned baby if the doji has a gap before and after, where the shadows do not touch. Due to the nature of the gap in trading price, a bullish abandoned baby pattern is extremely rare.

  Abandoned Baby, Bearish: An abandoned baby bearish pattern will feature ascending candlesticks, followed by a gap before and after the doji, with the candlesticks falling immediately after. Similar to the bullish Abandoned baby pattern, this chart is very rare in practice. 
  Advanced Block: Advance block patterns have three consecutive higher closes in the stock price, with the third and final candle showing signs of weakness. At this point, the bulls have lost their momentum, with a possible slowdown in the near future.
  Above the Stomach: Above the stomach pattern highlights the beginning of a weaker reversal comparative to other signs. In this pattern, the market must open at least midway above yesterday’s trading and also close above the previous close.  
  A bullish Belt: Hold pattern appears when a candle opens at the low of the session and closes at, or near, the session highs. If a bullish belt hold appears at a low price level, look for a rally to follow.  
  Bearish Belt-Hold Line: A bearish belt hold is a long red candle that opens at the day’s highs and later closes at, or near, the lows. Like the bullish belt hold line, the a bearish belt hold pattern is considered to be a top reversal at a high price level.  
  The Bullish breakaway: The Bullish breakaway signals a reversal in fortune towards bullish behavior. The pattern begins with a large decline, a gap lower, continual losses, and then a rise back above the level set by the large decline.  
  The Bearish Breakaway: The bearish breakaway follows a similar pattern as the bullish breakaway but, instead of gaining, the bearish breakaway drops in value. However, this pattern is extremely rare and is unlikely to be seen in stock patterns.  
   The Bullish Counterattack Line: In a bullish counterattack line, the first candle features a lower close with the second candle opening sharply lower and then having the bulls push prices back up to the same close as the first candle. This pattern usually occurs in a decline.
  Bearish Counterattack Line: In contrast, the bearish  counterattack line features bullish momentum in the first candle and the second candle opening higher as a result of the bulls. However, the bears come out fighting and pull down the price so that the close matches the previous day’s bullish close.
  Bullish Engulfing: In a bullish engulfing pattern, the market must be in a clear uptrend, have the second candle “engulf” the first, and the two candles must be opposite colors.  
  Bearish Engulfing: In a bearish engulfing pattern, the market must be in a clear uptrend, have the second candle “engulf” the first, and the two candles must be opposite colors. In this trend, supply must overwhelm demand and push prices lower.
  Bullish Gapping Play: The bullish gapping play leads to a new rally out of a stalled upward trend. This is an upside window above a high price congestion band. A buy signal arises if prices gap above this consolidation. 
   

The Bearish Gapping Play: This is the bearish counterpart to the bullish gapping play and leads to a downside window after a stalled downward trend. After a sharp decline in the first candle, the market consolidates with short candles near the lows. This is a sell signal if prices gap below the consolidation candles.

 

Bullish Harami: A bullish harami pattern consists of a small bar that is completely contained within an unusually large bar. This pattern is considered the opposite of an engulfing pattern.  

  The Bearish Harami: Like the bullish harami, the bearish harami features a small real body completely contained by a larger body. This pattern illustrates that the bear market has been slightly weakened.
  The Bullish Harami Cross: A harami cross is similar to the harami pattern, but because the cross pattern contains a doji, it is a more effective reversal signal than a regular harami pattern.
  Bearish Harami Cross: Like the bullish harami cross, the bearish harami cross is similar to the bearish harami, but because it contains a doji, it is considered a more effective bottom signal.  
  Bullish separating Lines: The bullish separating lines pattern consists of two individual candlesticks, a downward candlestick followed by an upward candlestick that opens with a gap up. In other words both candlesticks open on or near the same price. 
  Bearish separating lines:The bearish separating lines pattern consists of two individual candlesticks, an upward candlestick followed by a downward candlestick that opens with a gap down. In other words both candlesticks open on or near the same price.
  Bearish side by side white lines:The bearish side by side white lines pattern has price gap significantly lower, with buyers coming into the market as investors cover their short positions. Once the pattern finishes and all shorts are covered, the stock is free to resume its downtrend.
  Bearish doji star:The bearish Doji star pattern is a beginning sign of a reversal in the stock price as the bullish pattern begins to lose momentum with the doji forming in the second day of trading. Similar to a biker riding up a hill, as the hill reaches the top, it loses momentum and begins to fall.  
  Bullish meeting lines:The bullish meeting lines pattern has the price of the stock falling for a number of days, dropping lower, and then gapping lower before closing at the previous day’s close. This pattern is often split between a true reversal or a one day uptrend.
  Bullish meeting lines: Like the bullish meeting lines, the bearish meeting lines pattern has the price of the stock rising for a number of days, running higher, and then gapping higher againg before turning around and closing at the previous day’s close.This pattern is not truly indicative of any true pattern 
  Bullish tri star: The bullish tri star is a bullish reversal formation. This works as an excellent buy signal if the last day is in the form of a green candlestick, a gap up or a higher close. 
  Bearish tri star: The bearish tri star doji cluster is a bearish reversal formation. The formation forms as a bull market cools down and slowly starts to turn around. 
  Black spinning top:The black spinning top is the highest frequency pattern and as such, means very little to future directions for the stock. The pattern follows a stock’s open and close falling within its high and low of the day. 
  Black marubozu: The black marubozu pattern is a very simple pattern but like the spinning top, tells very little about future direction. The pattern is formed with the stock opening at the highs and
falling straight down to the day’s lows.
   Marubozu, Closing white: the closing white marubozu pattern is similar to the marubozu pattern but features the stock closing at the high of the day and instead of opening at the low, the stock trends lower early in the trading day.
   Marubozu, Closing black:The closing black marubozu pattern is the exact opposite of the closing white pattern. In this candlestick chart, the market opens and initially gains but the bears take over for the rest of the day and finish on the lows.
   Concealing Baby Swallow: The Concealing Baby Swallow Pattern is meant to begin a reversal in the stock but over the last decade, has been one of the least seen indicators. The pattern has a significant decline with the latest candlestick completing engulfing the previous day’s candlestick.
   Dark cloud cover: The dark cloud cover pattern is the beginning of a bearish reversal. In the pattern, the bulls advance the stock in the first day, only for the stock to gap higher the second day but fall to the bears at the close.
  Deliberation: In theory the deliberation model is supposed to be a bearish reversal, however, in practice, it can be used to justify a bullish continuation in over 75% of all cases. The pattern is quite easy to see with stocks continually jumping higher and closing higher on the day.  
  Doji, Dragonfly: The dragonfly doji is formed when the market opens at the highs of the day, drops significantly, and then rallies back to regain the losses before the close. However, the pattern is not a great indicator of overall market trend as should be taken with a grain of salt.  
  Doji gravestone: The doji gravestone is a bearish reversal formation that indicates an unsustainable bullish rally. Bulls run the prices up, to be slammed back down to the opening price.
   Long legged doji: The long legged doji is a formation where the opening and closing prices are equal despite price swings during the day. These formations are the most significant during strong up and down trends and suggests that markets are in equilibrium.
  Northern doji: The northern doji acts as a bullish continuation as markets are typically taking a breather after a rally. 
   Southern doji: Unlike the northern doji, this is a reversal formation. The southern doji represents market equilibrium; as the market takes a pause.
 

The doji star: In uptrend is a bearish reversal formation as bull markets lose steam. This is a relatively balanced point with indications that bulls are not fully confident in their move. 
   

Doji Star in Downtrend: A star that follows a long bearish candlestick is typically a sign that the market will turn around as sellers lose confidence in the move.

 

The evening doji star: is a bearish reversal pattern that slowly turns around. The formation starts out bullish, next consolidates with a doji, and begins to decline with a red candle. 

 

Morning Doji Star: This is the opposite of the evening doji star, signaling a bullish reversal. 

   

Upside Tasuki Gap: The upside tasuki gap is a bullish continuation pattern with a bearish candle opening within the bullish candle above the gap and closing lower to fill the gap.

   

Downward Gapping Tasuki: The downward tasuki gap is a bearish continuation pattern and is most easily initially identified by a gap down after a bullish candle in a downtrend. Following the second candle, a green candle is present representing buyers at a low price level, yet the trend continues to move downward.

   

Evening Star: The evening star is a classic bearish reversal pattern. The formation starts with a bullish candle continuing the previous trend. The second candle gaps up and then falls due to lack of conviction from the bulls and then continues to fall in the third candle.

  The Morning Star: The morning star formation starts with a long bearish candle as a continuation of a bearish trend followed by a downward gap. A small bullish candle forms after the gap as bulls start to take advantage of the new low price. The third candle is confirmation that the trend has reversed to a bullish trend. 
  Falling Three Methonds: The falling three methods is a bearish continuation formation that initiates with a long bearish bar. After the bearish bar, small consecutive indecisive bars form an uptrend. The indecisive bars do not necessarily have to be bullish. After the slight uptrend, a full bearish bar brings the market back to the downtrend.
   Falling Window: A falling window is present when the previous low’s wick is above the following bar’s upper wick. This formation suggests that the market may have exhausted its falling trend.
  The Hammer: A hammer is a bullish reversal pattern with a wick more than twice as long as the body. Analysts typically do not differentiate the color of this candle as the most important quality is that the body of the candle is consolidated at the top of the bar. A hammer signifies weakening in bearish sentiment. 
  The Inverted Hammer: The bullish inverted hammer is a reversal setup that takes place at the end of a downtrend. The candle takes its shape when bulls rally during the day but were unable to sustain buying. The bears take over and the candle closes near the lows. The bullish reversal is confirmed by a bullish candle the next day.
The Hanging Man: The hanging man typically presents a bearish reversal opportunity. The formation indicates an exhausted trend with a large sell off after the open, to rise later in the day and close near the highs of the day. Analysts are not worried about the color of the hanging man.
High Waves: High waves are a sign of indecision and can lead to a reversal. they consist of two large legged doji that indicate that the market is in a relative equilibrium state.
The Homing Pigeon: The homing pigeon is a bullish reversal formation characterized by a large bearish candle at the end of a down trend, followed by an engulfed bearish candle.
Identical Three Crows: The identical three crows formation is a bearish reversal signal if spotted correctly. Traders should watch for a bullish candle at the end of a rally followed by two consecutive red candles, opening around the previous candle’s close.
The Kicking Bullish: The bullish kicking pattern hints that the market is heading into a rally. The previous market trend is not significant when identifying this pattern.
The Kicking Bearish: The bearish kicking pattern hints that the market is heading lower. The previous market trend is not significant when identifying this pattern.
The Last Engulfing Top: The last engulfing top is a bearish reversal candle formation. The formation can be identified by a small bearish candle in an upward trend, engulfed by a larger bullish candle in the following period.
The Last Engulfing Bottom: The last engulfing bottom is a bullish reversal candle formation. The formation can be identified by a small bullish candle in a downward trend, engulfed by a larger bearish candle in the following period.
The Long White Day: The long white day candle indicates bullish sentiment. The long white day does not have long shadows and typically leads to further upside movement.
The Long Black Day:The long black day candle indicates bearish sentiment. The long black day does not have long shadows and typically leads to further downside movement.
The In-Neck Pattern:The in neck pattern is a bearish continuatio
n pattern characterized by a bullish candlestick with a close at or above the close of the previous bearish candle. This should occur in a downward trend and typically indicates a continuation of the trend if the following candle breaks the bullish candle’s low.
The Mat Hold: The mat hold formation is similar to the rising three method formation as they are both bullish continuation patterns interrupted by a slight bearish trend. The mat hold formation is different in that the third day in the downtrend is fully engulfed in the body of the initial bullish candle.  
The Matching Low: The matching low candlestick formation indicates a new support level and typically leads ti a bullish reversal. After the first bearish candle, the market opens higher to then trade down and test the previous lows. A buy signal is present if the third day is bullish.
The Piercing Pattern: The piercing pattern indicates a reversal to the upside after a bearish trend. The downward gap leading to a bullish candle indicates that the bears have run out of steam and that the markets are starting to head in the opposite direction.
The Marubozu, Opening White: The opening white marubozu is a bullish candle without a downward shadow. This indicates that the market moved up after the open without making new lows. Prices continued to rise throughout the period to make new highs and then settle below the new highs. This candle is characteristic of the typical bullish day or period.
The Marubozu, Opening Black: The opening black marubozu is a bearish formation indicating that the market went straight down after the opening of the candle. The marubozu is characterized by its long bearish body with a wick to the downside, indicating that new lows have been tested.
The Rickshaw Man: The rickshaw man indicates lack of conviction in the market. During this candle, new lows and highs are tested with both the open and the close of the period located near the center of the bar.
The Rising Window: Rising windows are bullish continuation formations where a new window is opened to the upside. The window formed should be used as a new support for the upward trend.
The Rising Three Methods: The rising three methods is a bullish continuation formation with a slight bearish period during an upward trend. The formation starts with a long bullish candle, followed by a period of three consecutive bearish small candles, each lower than the previous. After testing a downward trend, the buyers come back in to form a long bullish candle to continue the original bullish trend.
The Shooting Star: A shooting star is a bearish reversal formation indicating a change in momentum. This candle indicates that new highs have been tested and that the rally is unsustainable.
Side-by-Side White Lines: Side-by-side white lines indicates a bullish continuation with an upward gap above a bullish trend followed by two bullish candles, the second making new highs.
The Stalled Pattern: The stalled pattern picks the top of an upward trend. The trend slowly starts to fade and indicates a reversal. The loss of momentum indicates a loss in bullish momentum as candlesticks get smaller and smaller.

The Star in Uptrend: The star in uptrend is a bearish reversal formation that takes place after an uptrend.

The Star in Downtrend:The star in downtrend formation is a bullish reversal formation that is identified by a bullish candle without a downward wick at the bottom of a downtrend. The star at the bottom of the trend indicates a possible reversal.
The Stick Sandich: The stick sandwich is a bullish reversal formation identified by three candlesticks forming a support level and then trading upward after a bounce off the support.
The Takuri Line: The takuri line should have a downside wick that is at least two times as long as the body of the candle. This formation identifies that the current period has strong bearish forces, but not enough to bring the close to the downside of the candle.
Three Black Crows:The three black crows pattern is bearish and is used to predict a reversal to the downside. The formation is identified by three consecutive bearish bars after a rally. Each bar in the three bar sequence should be lower than the previous candle in the formation.
The Three White Soldiers: Three white soldiers is a bullish reversal formation confirmed by three consecutive bullish bars, each higher than the previous day. This formation should confirm more bullish moves to come.
Three Inside Up: Three inside up is a bullish reversal formation. The first part of the pattern starts with a bullish harami formation, confirming the reversal with a bullish candlestick on the third day.
Three Outside Up: This is a bullish reversal pattern starting with a bearish candlestick. The next candle is bullish and engulfs the first candle and the third candle continues the bullish trend up.
The Thrusting Pattern: The thrusting pattern is a bearish continuation pattern characterized by a green candlestick that starts below and closes within the previous red candlestick.
The Tweezers Bottom and Hammer: This is a bearish reversal pattern recognized by a tweezers bottom with a hammer testing new lows. The tweezers can be formed by two bodies, wicks or doji.

The Tweezers Top: Tweezers tops indicate a pullback after testing the period highs.

The Tweezers Bottom: This is a bullish reversal pattern where new lows are tested twice.
The Tweezer Top and Harami Cross: This is a bearish reversal formation formed at the top of an uptrend. Doji candles represent indecision and in this case represent the bulls uncertainty in maintaining the bullish trend.
The Tweezer Top and Shooting Star: Tweezers top and shooting star is a bearish reversal formation when a tweezers top is joined by a bearish shooting star. This is recognized by a bullish candlestick at the top of an uptrend followed by a bearish shooting star candlestick that tests the previous candlestick’s high.
The Tweezers Bottom and Hammer: Tweezers bottom and hammer is a bearish reversal pattern identified by a hammer that tests the prior bearish candlestick’s lows.
The Tweezer Bottom and Piercing Pattern: Tweezers bottom and piercing pattern is a bearish reversal pattern recognized by a bullish piercing candlestick with a tweezers bottom when its low matches the low of the previous candlestick.
Two Black Gapping Candles: Two black gapping candles is a bearish continuation pattern identified by a red candle followed by a new red candle opening within the previous candle and closing lower.
The Two Candle Shooting Star: The two candle shooting star is a bearish reversal pattern where an upward trending candle is followed by a bullish price gap followed by new highs. The second candle then retreats and closes green at a price below the period highs.
The Two Crows: Two crows is a bearish reversal formation when the market is in an uptrend. The first candlestick is green, followed by a gapped up red candlestick and then another red candle that opens within the body of the second day and closes within the candle of the first day.
The Umbrella Lines: This is a reversal doji pattern consisting of two candles without upper wicks. This represents a bullish reversal at the bottom and a bearish reversal at the top.
The Unique Three-River Bottom: The unique three river bottom is a very rare bullish reversal formation identified by a black candlestick, followed by another black candlestick with a close higher than the previous. The last candle is green and indicates that the market has lost selling pressure.
The Upside Gap Three Method:This is a bullish continuation pattern characterized by two long green candlesticks separated by an upward gap and followed by a black candlestick. The final candlestick represents profit taking.
The Upside Tasuki Gap: The bullish upside tasuki gap formation is a continuation formation of two long white candlesticks separated by an upward gap. The two white candles are followed by a black candlestick that partially closes the gap between the first two. The black candle is the result of profit taking.
The Upside-Gap Two Crows:The bearish upside gap, two crows is a reversal formation after a prior bullish pattern. This formation is initially identified by a long white candlestick on the first candle followed by two black body candles. The second black candle should engulf the first to complete this formation. This indicates that the new highs of the period cannot hold.
The Marubozu, White:The white marubozu is a bullish single candlestick pattern that does not have candle wicks. The candle opens at the lows and closes at the highs.
The White Spinning Top: The white spinning top is an indecisive candle, where the upper and lower wicks are longer than the body’s length. This candle shows that the market mover sharply in both directions before staying within a middle range.

KOTM Options Education Videos

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1.1 Intro Into Options – Options Basics 

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1.2 Volatility – Options Basics


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1.3 Calls – What they are and when to use them – Options Basics

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1.4 Puts – What they are and when to use them – Options Basics

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1.5 Options Greeks pt 1 – Delta & Gamma – Options Basics  

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1.6 Options Greeks pt 2 – Vega, Theta, Rho – Options Basics 


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  2. 1 Ichimoku Cloud – Part 1      

videoIcon1.7 Credit Spreads and Covered Calls

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1.8 Trading Options With Stock


videoIcon1.9 Buying Call and Put Spreads
 

videoIcon1.10 Selling Call and Puts Spreads

 

Harmonic Patterns

Harmonic Trading is a methodology that utilizes the recognition of specific price patterns and the alignment of exact Fibonacci ratios to determine highly probable reversal points in financial price cha

What Are Harmonic Patterns?

Harmonic Trading is a methodology that utilizes the recognition of specific price patterns and the alignment of exact Fibonacci ratios to determine highly probable reversal points in financial price charts. This methodology assumes that trading patterns or cycles adhere to natural harmonic mathematical ratios and repeat themselves, sometimes in a fractal nature. Once these patterns are identified, they can be used to enter or exit trading positions with very high degrees of accuracy. Although, harmonic patterns are not 100% accurate and sometimes fail, they have been historically affirmed as some of the most highly precise patterns to trade. The most comprehensive references to Harmonic Trading are outlined in the following books:

  1. Profits in the Stock Market – H.M. Gartley
  2. Fibonacci Ratios with Pattern Recognition – Larry Pesavento
  3. Trade What You See: How to Profit from Pattern Recognition – Larry Pesavento
  4. The Gartley Trading Method: New Techniques to Profit from the Markets Most Powerful Formation – Ross Beck
  5. Harmonic Trading: Volume One, Volume Two – Scott M. Carney
  6. Trade Chart Patterns like the Pros – Suri Dudella

Below is a Visual Reference Guide to Identifying Specific Harmonic Patterns

1. Starting at point X:
    –  The lowest or highest point in the pattern (depending on Bullish or Bearish).
    –  Usually a significant major high or low on a chart. (sometimes a capitulation High or Low with heavy volume)

2. Then identify a swing level high/low A.
    –  The move from X to A is the first move contra the previous trend.
    –  This move is going to be the primary basis for the macro pattern identification.

3. Identify & Measure B Retracement.
    –  The move from A to B is in the direction of the macro trend and is the most critical point in most patterns for projecting the final D point.
    –  (D=Potential Reversal Zone).

Using the Visual References note that the grey dashed lines that connect two points represent the level of retracement in % terms. Example for Bullish Gartley: B point is 61.8% retracement downward from the previous move of X to A. Point C is then either 38.2% or 88.6% retracement of prior down move of A to B. Then D would then be projected 113.0% or 161.8% downward from point C, using the length of B to C for the base length to be projected.

4. The last projected move D is the final and key point that we are trying to project for the potential reversal zone.
    –  The prior point B as stated before is most critical because serving as a reference point in space, level D is then projected using key Fibonacci levels.
    –  Additionally, the projected levels from D are also lined up with key retracements from the X-A move thus creating a precise parallax view point that projects an exact turning point from two previous reaction zones.

 *It is also key to note that a distinct AB=CD patterns do form in variations of these patterns. The simple Harmonic AB=CD and ALT AB=CD 4 point patterns do appear independently from 5 point patterns as well. Additionally, the Three Drives pattern is a obscure harmonic pattern that exists as well. For all these harmonic patterns, the point is to wait for the entire pattern to complete before taking any short or long trades.

*When I trade these patterns I do not see D as an area to blindly just place buy or sell orders, but I look for key reversal bars/candlesticks as well as other technical indicators to provide further catalyst for trade execution. And I always use a stop loss order.

BullGartley BearishsGartley
BullBat BearBat
BearishAltBat BearAltBat
BullishButterfly BearishButterfly
BullishCrab BearishCrab
BullishDeepCrab BearishDeepCrab
Bullish5-0Pattern Bearish5-0Pattern
BullishABCD BearishABCD
BullishALTABCD BearishALTABCD
BullishThreeDrives BearishThreeDrives
BullishSeahorse BearishSeahorse

Option Risk Profiles

Risk Graphs, also known as a risk/reward diagrams, payoff diagrams or profit/loss diagrams, are charts that represent the profit or loss of an option across a spectrum of prices. Risk Profiles allow option traders to evaluate the risk/reward characteristics of an option trading strategy. Risk Profiles display at a glance where are the areas of the highest gains and losses occur. This enables option traders to make more educated decisions without complex calculations. Risk profiles also allow option traders to identify option trading strategies with similar risk/reward profiles, making synthetic positions easier to create and manage. Risk Profiles are simple diagrams made up of 2 axis and a line representing option price at various prices of the underlying security. The horizontal axis or X-Axis represents stock price and the vertical axis or Y-Axis represents option profit or loss. 

RiskProfileExample

Is Risk/Reward Limited Or Unlimited
To find out if the risk/reward of an option trading strategy is limited or unlimited through a Risk Profile Graph, a Trader would look at the top end and bottom end of the graph line. If the top end of the graph line is pointing upwards, it is an option trading strategy with unlimited profit potential. If the top end of the graph line is pointing horizontally, it means that it is an option trading strategy with limited profit potential and will rise in price no further when a certain stock price has been reached.

Unlimitedprofitpotential Limited Profit Potenial

In Addition, if the bottom end of the profile risk graph line is pointing downwards, it is an option trading strategy with unlimited loss potential. If the bottom end of the profile risk graph line is pointing sideways, horizontally, it means that it is an option trading strategy with limited loss potential and will lose no more money beyond a certain stock price has been reached.

UnlimitedProPot Limited Loss Pot 

Direction of Profit

An option trading strategy turns a profit when the Risk Profile Graph line crosses above the X-Axis (horizontal axis). Remember, the center of a risk graph is the prevailing stock price when the chart is built and that stock price increases to the right and decreases to the left. If the Risk Profile Graph line crosses above the X-Axis to the right, it means that the stock price needs to increase in order to turn a profit. If the profile risk graph line crosses above the X-Axis to the left, it means that the stock price needs to decrease in order to turn a profit.

profit when Stock Rises Profit when Stock Falls

Where is Breakeven on an Option Trade
The Breakeven Point of an option trade is presented on the Risk Profile Graph as the point where the graph line touches the X-Axis (horizontal axis). This is the point where the option position neither gains nor losses money. In more complex strategies, there could be more than one breakeven point. Where the breakeven points are in relation to the center of the profile risk graph, it tells you which direction the stock price must go in order for the position to breakeven. 

BreakEven Strangle BreakevenCall

Option Strategy Risk Profiles
The following charts illustrate the profit and loss profiles for many popular option strategies.The profit and loss profiles simply show what your option trade profit or loss will be for various stock prices at expiration. It is important to understand that all profit and loss diagrams shown in this reference guide are drawn at expiration of the options. Please note that prior to expiration the diagrams can look very different. Just because a diagram shows a profit at a particular stock price at expiration does not mean that same strategy will be profitable at that same point prior to expiration. Still, the charts are important to understand because they help you get a feel for each strategy and what it is trying to accomplish.

Listed for each strategy:
Outlook: Tells whether the strategy is bullish, bearish or neutral. Bullish strategies make money when the underlying stock rises while bearish strategies make money when it falls and neutral strategies make money when the stock does not move.
Directional Risk: Describes what the risks are for each individual strategy. For example, if a strategy has unlimited risk if the underlying stock rises, this field will say “unlimited upside.” On many positions you may see “unlimited downside risk” meaning there is potential for unlimited losses if the stock falls. To be exact, this is not unlimited risk since a stock cannot fall below zero. However, since it is extremely rare to see a stock down to a price of zero, this risk is still considered to be unlimited.
Max gain: Shows the maximum amount of profit that could be made.
Max loss: Shows the maximum amount of loss that could be occur.
Breakeven: Shows the stock price (or prices) where the strategy breaks even; that is the point where the trader neither makes nor loses money.


 

Long Stock
Outlook: Bullish
Directional Risk: Purchase Price of Stock.
Max gain: Unlimited upside.
Max loss: Purchase price.
Breakeven: Purchase price + commissions.

 LongStock
 

Short Stock
Outlook: Bearish.
Directional Risk: Limited upside.
Max gain: Initial credit.
Max loss: Unlimited.
Breakeven: Sale price + commissions.

 Short Stock
 

Long Call
Outlook: Bullish.
Directional Risk: Limited downside.
Max gain: Unlimited upside.
Max loss: Premium (amount paid). Occurs if stock closes below strike price + premum paid at expiration.
Breakeven: Strike price + premium.
Synthetic option equivalent: Long stock Long put

 Long Call
 

Short Call
Outlook: Neutral to slightly bearish.
Directional Risk: Limited upside.
Max gain: Premium – Commissions (initial credit). Occurs if stock closes below strike price at expiration.
Max loss: Unlimited.
Breakeven: Strike price premium.

 Short Call
 

Long Put
Outlook: Bearish
Directional Risk: Limited upside.
Max gain: Occurs at a stock price of zero.
Max loss: Premium + Commissions (amount paid). Occurs if stock closes above strike price at expiration.
Breakeven: Strike price – premium.

 Long Put
 

Short Put
Outlook: Neutral to slightly bullish
Directional Risk: Limited downside.
Max gain: Premium – Commissions (initial credit). Occurs if stock closes above strike at expiration.
Max loss: Strike price – premium. Occurs at a stock price of zero.
Breakeven: Strike price – premium.
Synthetic equivalent: Long stock Short call (covered call).

 Short Put
 

Long Straddle
Position: Long call long put with same strike and time to expiration.
Outlook: (1) Extremely bullish or bearish but unsure of direction or
(2) Expecting an increase in implied volatility.
Directional Risk: None.
Max gain: Unlimited upside and Limited downside.
Max loss: Premiums paid for both options. Occurs if stock closes at strike price at expiration.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Upper: Strike price call + put premium + commissions. Lower: Strike price – call + put premiums + commisions.

 Long Straddle
 

Short Straddle
Position: Short call short put with same strike and time to expiration.
Outlook: (1) Overall neutral outlook but can also be slightly bullish or slightly bearish if credit is large enough or (2) Expecting a decrease in implied volatility.
Directional Risk: Unlimited upside and Limited downside.
Max gain: Premiums received from both options. Occurs if stock closes at strike price at expiration.
Max loss: Unlimited.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Upper: Strike price + Straddle price + commissions.
Lower: Strike price – Straddle price + commissions.

 Short Straddle
 

Long Strip
Position: Buy 2 puts and buy 1 call with same strike and time to expiration.
Outlook: (1) Extremely bullish or bearish but favoring bearish or
(2) Expecting an increase in implied volatility.
Directional Risk: None.
Max gain: Unlimited upside and Limited downside.
Max loss: Premiums paid for all options + commissions. Occurs if stock closes at strike price at expiration.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Upper: Strike price + price paid of 3 options.
Lower: Strike price – price paid of 3 options.

 Long Strip
 

Short Strip
Position: Sell 2 puts and sell 1 call with same strike and time to expiration.
Outlook: (1) Neutral to slightly bullish or bearish but more fearful of upward move or (2) Expecting a decrease in implied volatility.
Directional Risk: Unlimited upside and downside.
Max gain: Premiums received for all options. Occurs if stock closes at strike price at expiration.
Max loss: Unlimited upside and downside.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Upper: Strike price call and put premiums
Lower: Strike price – half the call and put premiums

 Short Strip
 

Long Strap
Position: Buy 2 calls and buy 1 put with same strike and time to expiration.
Outlook: (1) Extremely bullish or bearish but favoring bullish or
(2) Expecting an increase in implied volatility.
Directional Risk: None.
Max gain: Unlimited.
Max loss: Premiums paid for all options. Occurs if stock closes at strike price at expiration.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Upper: Strike price half the call and put premiums. Lower:Strike price – the call and put premiums.

 Long Strap
 

Short Strap
Position: Sell 2 calls and sell 1 put with same strike and time to expiration.
Outlook: (1) Neutral to slightly bullish or slightly bearish but more fearful of the downside or (2) Expecting a decrease in implied volatility.
Directional Risk: Unlimited upside and downside.
Max gain: Premiums received for all options. Occurs if stock closes at strike price at expiration.
Max loss: Unlimited upside and downside.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Upper: Strike price half the call and put premiums.
Lower: Strike price – the call and put premiums.

 Short Strap
 

Long Strangle
Position: Buy 1 low strike put and buy 1 high strike call.
Outlook: (1) Extremely bullish or bearish but uncertain of direction or
(2) Expecting an increase in implied volatility.
Directional Risk: None.
Max gain: Unlimited upside and downside.
Max loss: Premiums paid for both options. Occurs if stock stays between strikes at expiration.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Upper: Call strike call and put premiums.
Lower: Put strike – call and put premiums.

 Long Strangle
 

Short Strangle
Position: Sell 1 low strike put and sell 1 high strike call.
Outlook: Neutral to slightly bullish or slightly bearish.
Directional Risk: Unlimited upside and downside.
Max gain: Premiums received from both options. Occurs if stock closes between strikes at expiration.
Max loss: Unlimited upside and downside.
Breakeven: (2 breakeven points):
Upper: Call strike call and put premiums.
Lower: Put strike – call and put premiums.

 ShortStrangle
 

Covered Call (Buy-Write)
Position: Buy stock and sell calls (equivalent contract amounts) against it.
Outlook: Neutral to slightly bullish.
Directional Risk: Unlimited downside.
Max gain: (2 possible)
(1) Time premium received from calls (occurs if call strike is less than or equal to stock purchase price). 
(2) Time premium received plus capital gain (occurs if call strike is higher than stock purchase price). Regardless of which strike is sold, the maximum gain occurs if the stock price is greater than the strike price at expiration.
Max loss: Stock price less the premium received from call (net cost to purchase the stock). Occurs at a stock price of zero.
Breakeven: Stock price less premium received.

 BuyWrite
 

Covered Put (Sell-Write)
Position: Short stock and sell puts (equivalent contract amounts) against it.
Outlook: Neutral to slightly bearish (may be slightly bullish is premium is big enough).
Directional Risk: Unlimited upside.
Max gain:
(1) Time premium received from puts (
occurs if stock price is less than or equal to the put strike at expiration). (2) Time premium received plus capital gain (occurs if call strike is lower than stock short sale price). 
Regardless of which strike is sold, the maximum gain occurs if the stock price is less than the strike price at expiration.
Max loss: Unlimited upside
Breakeven:
Short sale price plus put option premium received.

 Sell Write
 

Bull Spread
Position (Usually done with either all calls or all puts):
Calls (debit spread): Buy a low strike call and sell a higher strike call.
Puts (credit spread): Sell a high strike put and buy a lower strike put.
(Whether using calls or puts, you are always buying the low strike and selling the high strike.)
Outlook:Neutral to moderately bullish depending on how constructed.
Directional Risk: Limited downside.
Max gain:Calls: Difference in strike prices less debit.
Puts: Credit received
Regardless of whether call or puts are used, the max gain occurs if the stock price is greater than the higher strike price at expiration.
Max loss:Calls: Premium paid.
Puts: Difference in strikes less premium received.
Whether using calls or puts, the max loss occurs if the stock price is below the lower strike price at expiration.
Breakeven:Calls: Long call strike plus debit.
Puts: Credit received
Regardless of whether call or puts are used, the max gain occurs if the stock price is greater than the higher strike price at expiration.
Max loss:
Calls: Premium paid.
Whether using calls or puts, the max loss occurs if the stock price is below the lower strike price at expiration.
Breakeven:Calls: Long call strike plus debit.
Puts: High strike put less premium received. 

 Bull Spread
 

Bear Spread
Position (usually done with either all calls or all puts):
Calls (credit spread): Sell a low strike call and buy a higher strike call.
Puts: (debit spread): Buy high strike put and sell a lower strike put.
Outlook:Neutral to moderately bearish depending on how constructed.
Directional Risk: Limited upside.
Max gain: Calls: Credit received.
Puts: Difference in strike prices less debit.
Max loss:Calls: Difference in strikes less premium received.
Puts: Premium paid
Whether using calls or puts, the max loss occurs if the stock price is greater than the higher strike at expiration.
Breakeven:Calls: Short call strike plus premium received.
Puts: High strike put less premium received.

 BearSpread
 

Long Butterfly Spread
Position (usually done with either all calls or all puts):
Calls or Puts: Buy 1 low strike option, sell 2 medium strikes, and buy 1 high strike. All strikes should be equally spaced with same time to expiration.
Outlook: (1) Neutral but can be slightly bullish or slightly bearish depending on how constructed or (2) Expecting a rise in the skew curve.
Directional Risk: Limited upside and downside.
Max gain: Difference in middle strikes and one of the end strikes (also called the “wings”) less premium paid. Occurs if stock price equals center strike price at expiration.
Max loss: Premium paid. Occurs if stock closes above or below outer strikes (also called the “wings”) at expiration.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Lower: Low strike premium
Upper: High strike – premium

 LongButterfly
 

Short Butterfly Spread
Position (usually done with either all calls or all puts):
Calls or Puts: Sell 1 low strike option, buy 2 medium strikes, and sell 1 high strike. All strikes should be equally spaced with same time to expiration.
Outlook: (1) Moderately bullish or bearish or (2) Expecting a fall in the skew curve
Directional Risk: None.
Max gain: Premium received. Occurs if the stock price is less than the lower strike or greater than the highest strike at expiration.
Max loss: Difference in middle strikes and end strikes (also called the “wings”) less premium paid. Occurs if stock closes at center strike price at expiration.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Lower: Low strike premium
Upper: High strike – premium

 ShortButterfly
 

Long Condor Spread
Position (usually done with either all calls or all puts):
Calls or Puts: Buy 1 low strike option, sell 2 successively higher strikes, and buy 1 at an even higher strike. All strikes should be equally spaced with same time to expiration.Outlook: Neutral to slightly bullish or bearish depending on how constructed or (2) Expecting a rise in the skew curve.
Directional Risk: None.
Max gain: Difference in two middle strikes (or any two successive strikes) less premium paid. Occurs if stock closes between middle strike prices at expiration.
Max loss: Premium paid.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Lower: Low strike premium
Upper: High strike – premium

 Long Condor
 

Short Condor Spread
Position (usually done with either all calls or all puts).
Calls or Puts: Sell 1 low strike option, buy 2 successively higher strikes, and sell 1 higher strike.
All strikes should be equally spaced with same time to expiration.
Outlook: Moderately bullish or bearish depending on how constructed or (2) Expecting a fall in the skew curve.
Directional Risk: None.
Max gain: Premium received. Occurs if the stock price is less than the lowest strike or greater than the highest strike at expiration.
Max loss: Difference in two successive strikes less premium received. Occurs if the stock price is between the two middle strikes at expiration.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Lower: Low strike premium
Upper: High strike – premium

 SHort Condor
 

Long Albatross Spread
Position (usually done with either all calls or all puts).
Calls or Puts: Buy 1 low strike option, sell 1 higher strike, skip a strike and sell the next higher strike, and buy 1 higher strike. All strikes should be equally spaced with same time to expiration.
Outlook: Neutral to moderately bullish or bearish depending on how constructed.
Directional Risk: Limited upside and downside.
Max gain: Difference in first two (or last two strikes) less premium paid. Occurs if stock price is less than the lowest strike or greater than the highest strike at expiration.
Max loss: Premium paid.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Lower: Low strike premium
Upper: High strike – premium

 Long Albatross
 

Short Alabatross Spread
Position (usually done with either all calls or all puts).
Calls or Puts: Sell 1 low strike option, buy 1 higher strike, skip a strike and buy the next higher strike, and sell 1 higher strike. All strikes should be equally spaced with same time to expiration.
Outlook: (1) Extremely bullish or bearish or (2) Expecting a fall in the skew curve.
Directional Risk: None.
Max gain: Credit received.
Max loss: Difference in two lowest (or two highest) strikes less premium. Occurs if the stock price
is between the two center strikes at expiration.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Lower: Low strike premium
Upper: High strike – premium

 ShortAlbatross
 

Call Backspread (Long Call Ratio Spread)
Position: Short low strike call and long more contracts of a higher strike call.
Outlook: Extremely bullish but also fearful of a downside move.
Directional Risk: Limited downside if debit spread (none if credit spread).
Max gain: Unlimited.
Max loss: Per spread, the maximum loss is the difference in strikes the debit amount (or minus the credit if trade executed for a credit). Occurs if the stock price equals the strike price of the long calls.
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a debit there is one breakeven point:
Long call strike 1/(R-1) * max loss; where R is the ratio of long calls to short calls (R must be 2 or greater).
If trade executed for a credit, there will be two breakeven points:
Lower: Short strike plus credit.
Upper: Same calculation is used as for debit spread

 Call Backspread
 

Short Call Ratio Spread
Position: Long low strike price call and short more contracts of a higher strike call.
Outlook: Slightly bullish but fearful of downturn.
Directional Risk: Unlimited upside. Limited downside if debit spread (none if credit spread).
Max gain: Limited. Occurs if the stock price equals the strike of the short calls at expiration. The max gain is the difference in strikes less the debit paid (or plus the credit received).
Max loss: Unlimited upside.
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a credit, there is one breakeven point: Short call strike 1/(R-1) * max gain; where R is the ratio of short calls to long calls (R must be greater than 2).
If trade executed for a debit there will be two breakeven points:
Lower: Strike of the short call debit
Upper: Same calculation is used as for credit spread
The formula for the lower breakeven will not change regardless of the number of short calls. This is because the slope of the profit and loss chart is only affected to the right (upper breakeven) of the short strike as shown in the profit and loss diagram above.

 ShortRatioCall
 

Put Backspread (Long Put Ratio Spread)
Position: Short a high strike put and long more contracts of a lower strike put.
Outlook: Extremely bearish but fearful of an upward move.
Directional Risk: Limited upside if debit spread (none if credit spread).
Max gain: Strike price of the long less debit (or plus credit). Occurs at a stock price of zero.
Max loss: Limited. Occurs if the stock price equals the strike of the long position at expiration.
Max loss is difference in strikes plus the debit amount (or less the credit amount).
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a debit, there is one breakeven point: Long put strike – 1/(R-1) * max loss; where R is the ratio of long puts to short puts (R must be greater than or equal to 2).
If trade executed for a credit, there will be two breakeven points:
Lower: Same calculation is used as for debit spread
Upper: Short strike – credit

 PutBackspread
 

Short Put Ratio Spread
Position: Long a high strike put and short more contracts of a lower strike put.
Outlook: Neutral to slightly bearish but fearful of upward move.
Directional Risk: Unlimited downside
Max gain: Limited. Occurs if the stock price equals the strike of the short puts at expiration. Max gain is difference in strike less debit (or plus credit).
Max loss: Max loss is difference in strikes plus the debit amount (or less the credit amount).
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a credit, there is one breakeven point: Short put strike – 1/(R-1) * max gain; where R is the ratio of short puts to long puts (R must be 2 or greater). Example: Buy 1 $50 put for $3 and sell 2 $45 puts for $2 for net credit of $1. There are twice as many puts purchased so R = 2. Because the max gain is $6, the breakeven is $45 – 1/(2-1) * $6 = $39.
If trade executed for a debit, there will be two breakeven points:
Lower: Same calculation is used as for credit spread
Upper: Long strike – debit

 Short PutRatio
 

Long Call Christmas Tree
Position: Short 1 lower strike call and long 1 contract of a higher strike call and long 1 more call at an even higher strike.
Outlook: Extremely bullish but fearful of a downward fall.
Directional Risk: Limited downside if debit spread (none if credit spread).
Max gain: Unlimited upside.
Max loss: Limited. Occurs if stock closes between strikes of two long positions at expiration.
If executed for credit: Max loss is difference between short strike and first long strike minus credit.
If executed for debit: Max loss is difference between short strike and first long strike plus debit.
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a debit, there is one breakeven point: Highest strike plus max loss.
If executed for a credit there will be two breakeven points:
Upper breakeven is same as for debit.
Lower breakeven will be the short strike credit.

 LongCallXmas
 

Short Call Christmas Tree
Position: Long low strike call and short 1 higher strike call and short 1 call at an even higher strike.
Outlook: Neutral but fearful of downturn.
Directional Risk: Unlimited upside.
Max gain: Limited. Max gain is difference in long and first short strike plus credit (or minus debit). Occurs if stock closes between two short strikes at expiration.
Max loss: Unlimited upside.
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a credit, there is one breakeven point: Highest strike plus max gain.
If trade executed for a debit, there are two breakeven points:
Upper: Same as for credit
Lower: Long strike plus debit

 ShortCallXmas
 

Long Put Christmas Tree
Position: Short 1 high strike put and long 1 contract of a lower strike put and long 1 more put at an even lower strike.
Outlook: Extremely bearish but fearful of an upward move.
Directional Risk: Limited upside if executed for debit (none if executed for credit).
Max gain: Lowest strike put minus max loss.
Max loss: Limited. Occurs if stock closes between strikes of two long positions at expiration.
If executed for debit: Max loss is difference between short strike and first long strike plus debit.
If executed for credit: Max loss is difference between short strike and first long strike minus credit.
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a debit, there is one breakeven point:
Breakeven = Lowest strike minus max loss.

 LongPutXmas
 

Short Put Christmas Tree
Position: Long high strike put and short a lower strike put and short a put at an even lower strike.
Outlook: Neutral to slightly bearish but fearful of an upward move.
Directional Risk: Unlimited downside.Max gain: Limited. Max gain is difference in long and first short strike plus credit (or minus debit). Occurs if stock closes between two short strikes at expiration.
Max loss: Low strike put minus max gain. Occurs at a stock price of zero.
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a credit, there is one breakeven point:
Breakeven = Low strike minus max gain.

 ShortPutXmas
 

Long Semifuture
Position: Long high strike call and short a lower strike put.
Outlook: Very bullish. The sale of the put reduces the cost of the call but also exposes the trader to unlimited downside risk.
Directional Risk: Unlimited downside.
Max gain: Unlimited.
Max loss: Put strike plus debit (or minus credit). Occurs at a stock price of zero.
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a credit:
Breakeven = Put strike minus credit

 LongSemifuture
 

Short Semifuture
Position: Long low strike put and short a higher strike call.
Outlook: Extremely bearish. The sale of the call reduces the cost of the put but also exposes the trader to unlimited upside risk.
Directional Risk: Unlimited upside.
Max gain: Put strike minus debit (or plus credit). Occurs at a stock price of zero.
Max loss: Unlimited upside.
Breakeven (2 possible breakeven points):
If trade executed for a credit:
Breakeven = Call strike plus credit.

 ShortSemiFutre
 

Long Wrangle
Position: Long call backspread and long put backspread.
Outlook: (1) Extremely bullish or bearish but uncertain of direction or (2) Expecting an increase in implied volatility.
Directional Risk: None.
Max gain: Unlimited upside and downside.
Max loss: Net debit + difference in strikes. Occurs if stock closes between the strikes at expiration.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Lower = Low strike minus max loss
Upper = High strike plus max loss

 Long Wrangle
 

Short Wrangle
Position: Short call ratio spread and short put ratio spread.
Outlook: Neutral to slightly bullish or bearish.
Directional Risk: Unlimited in both directions.
Max gain: Initial credit + difference in strikes. Occurs if stock closes between strikes at expiration.
Max loss: Unlimited upside and downside.
Breakeven (2 breakeven points):
Lower = Low strike minus max gain
Upper = High strike plus max gain

 Short Wrangle
 

Long Cartwheel
Position: Long call backspread and short put ratio spread.
Outlook: Extremely bullish to slightly bearish.
Directional Risk: Unlimited downside.
Max gain: Unlimited at extreme upside (above upper breakeven). Max gain at low strike (upper peak) = Difference in strikes + credit (or minus debit).
Max loss: Unlimited at extreme downside (below lower breakeven). Max loss at high strike (lower peak) =
Credit – difference in strikes (or debit + difference in strikes).
Breakeven (3 breakeven points):
Lower = Low strike – max gain at low strike
Middle = Low strike + 1/2 max gain at low strike
Upper = High strike plus max loss at high strike

 Long Cartwehee
 

Short Cartwheel
Position: Long put backspread and short call ratio spread.
Outlook: Extremely bearish to slightly bullish.
Directional Risk: Unlimited upside.
Max gain: Unlimited at extreme downside. Occurs at a stock price of zero. Max gain at high strike (upper peak) = Difference in strikes + credit (or minus debit).
Max loss: Unlimited at extreme upside (above upper breakeven). Max loss at low strike (lower peak) = Credit – difference in strikes (or debit + difference in strikes).
Breakeven (3 breakeven points):
Lower= Low strike – max loss at low strike
Middle = Low strike + 1/2 max loss at low strike
Upper= High strike plus max gain at high strike

 Short Cartwheel

Long Calendar Spread
Position: (Can be initiated with either either calls or puts).
Long a far month contract and short a shorter-term contract with equal strike prices.
Outlook: Neutral
Directional Risk: Limited upside and downside.
Max gain: Limited – assuming the positions are closed together at expiration of short strike. Occurs if stock closes at strike price of near-term contract at expiration. Difficult to say exactly what the max gain will be as the position is an attempt to exploit time decay and other factors will move as well.
Max loss: Limited to the net debit. Occurs if: (1) Stock closes below strike through both option expirations or (2) If stock makes a large move up or down prior to expiration of near-term strike.
Another scenario may happen: If the trader initiates the position and the stock makes a large move upward prior to January expiration, then both options will converge on intrinsic values and lose nearly all of their time premiums. The same is true if the stock collapses. In either case, the trader may lose the entire net debit.
Of course, if the stock collapses during the short-term contract and the position is nearly worthless, one choice for the trader is to close out the short and hold onto the long hoping for a rebound. The trader does not have this choice if the stock makes a large move upward since the short position will exercise and the trader will usually cover with the long position.
Breakeven:Strike price net debit.

LongCalendar

Short Calendar Spread
Position: (Can be initiated with either calls or both puts).
Buy a short-term contract and sell a longer-term contract with equal strike prices.
Outlook: Very bullish or bearish
Directional Risk: None
Max gain: Limited to net credit (usually slightly less). Occurs if stock closes well above or well below the strike at expiration of the near-term contract.
Max loss: Difficult to say exactly what the max loss will be as the position is an attempt to exploit time decay and other factors will move as well. Once the long position expires (short-term contract), the volatility (and skew) will dictate the price of the short position, which determines the potential loss.
Another scenario may happen: The stock may close at exactly the strike and January expiration. In this case, the long call is worthless and the trader must buy back the short call to close out the position. However, there is no way to determine what the market will be asking for this contract and thus no sure way to determine what the loss, if any, will be.
Breakeven:For the reason stated in the paragraph above, it is impossible to say where the breakeven points will be.

SHortCallendar


Option Greeks


What Are The Option Greeks?

The Mathematical characteristics of the Black-Scholes Model are named after the greek letters used to represent them in the equations. The 5 Option Greeks measure the sensitivity of the price  of stock options in relation to 4 different factors; Changes in the underlying stock price, interest rate, volatility and time decay. 

Delta

The movement of the option position relative to the movement of the underlying stock  position. Measures the speed at which the option position is moving relative to the underlying stock position. Therefore, a Delta of 1 means the option position is moving 1 point for every point the stock moves. A Delta of –1 means the option position ismoving –1 point for every point the underlying stock moves. Delta is another way of expressing the probability of an option expiringin-the-money.

Formula for calculating option Delta:

Delta

Formula Components

C = Value of the Call Option

S(t) = Current value of the underlying asset

N(d1) = Rate of change of the option price with respect to the price of the underlying asset

T = Option life as a percentage of the year

ln = Natural log 

Rf = Risk free rate of return

Gamma

Gamma is mathematically the second derivative of Delta and can be viewed in two ways: the acceleration of the option position relative to the underlying stock price, or the odds of a change in the probability of the position expiring ITM (in other words, the odds of a change in Delta). Gamma is effectively an early warning to the fact that Delta could be about to change.Both calls and puts have positive Gammas. Typically, deep OTM and deep ITM options have near zero Gamma because the odds of a change in Delta are very low. Logically, Gamma tends to peak around the strike price. Gamma is important because it shows us how fast our position delta changes in relation to the market price of the underlying asset.

Formula for calculation option Gamma:

GAMMA

Forumla Components

d1 = Refer to Delta Calculation

S = Current value of underlying asset

T = Option life as a percentage of a year

Theta

Theta stands for the option position’s sensitivity to time decay. Long options have negative Theta, meaning that everyday you own that option, time decay is eroding the Time Value portion of the option’s value. In other words, time decay is hurting the position of a Long option position. When you short options, Theta is positive, indicating that time decay is helping the option writer’s position. The closer to the expiration date, the higher the theta and the father away the expiration date, the lower the theta.  

The below graphs show the effect of Theta on options during the last 30 days to expiration. ITM and ATM options decay fastest during the last 30 days to expiration. OTM options decay the least during the final 30 days.

TimedecayITM otmdecay

Formula for Calculating Theta

theta_formula

d1 = Refer to Delta Calculation

T = Option life as a percentage of year

C = Value of Call Option

St = Current price of underlying asset

X = Strike Price

Rf = Risk free rate of return

N(d2) = Probability of option being in the money

Vega

Vega stands for the option position’s sensitivity to volatility. Options tend toincrease in value when the underlying stock’s volatility increases. So, volatility helps the owner of an option and hurts the writer of an option. Vega is positivefor long option positions and negative for short option positions.

Formula for Calculating Vega:

VEGA

Forumula Components

d1 = Refer to Delta Caculation above

S = Current Value of underlying asset

T = Option life as percentage of year

C = Value of Call Option

Rho

Rho stands for the option position’s sensitivity to interest rates. A positive Rho means that higher interest rates are helping the position, and a negative Rho means that higher interest rates are hurting the position. Rho is the least important of all the Greeks as far as stock options are concerned.

Rho Charateristics – Options Rho come in positive or negative polarity. Long call options produces positive options Rho and Long put options produces negative options rho. This means that call options rise in value and put options drop in value with a rise in interest rates. Options Rho increases as time to expiration becomes longer. Options Rho is almost equal for all ITM and decreases for OTM options.

RHO

d1 = Refer to Delta calculation

T = Option life as a percentage of year

C = Value of Call Option

X = Strike Price

N(d2) = Probabilty of option being in the money

Options Trading Glossary

American Stock Exchange – (AMEX) Securities Exchange that handles approximately 20% of all securities trades within the U.S.

American-Style Option – An option contract that can be exercised at any time before the expiration date. Stock options are American style.

Arbitrage – Where the simultaneous purchase and disposal of a combination of financial instruments is such that a guaranteed profit is made automatically.

Ask – The price that you buy at and the price that market makers and floor brokers are willing to sell at. The Ask stands for what the market makers and floor traders ask you to pay for the stock (or options or other instrument).

At the Opening Order – An order that specifies execution at the market opening or else it is cancelled.

ATM (At the Money) – Where the option exercise price is the same as the asset price.

Automatic Exercise – The automatic exercise of an ITM (In the Money) option by the clearing firm at expiration.

Backspread – A spread where more options (calls or puts) are bought than sold (the opposite of a Ratio Spread).

Bear Call Ladder – A strategy using calls where the trader sells a lower strike call and buys a higher strike call and another higher strike call.

Bear Call Spread – A bearish net credit strategy using calls where the trader buys a higher strike call and sells a lower strike call. The higher strike call will be cheaper, hence the net credit. Bear Call spreads have limited risk and reward, and are more profitable as the underlying asset price falls.  

Bear Put Ladder – A spread using puts where the trader sells a lower strike put and buys a higher strike put and another higher strike put.

Bear Put Spread – A net debit spread using only puts where the trader buys a higher strike put and sells a lower strike put. The higher strike put will be more expensive, hence the net debit. Bear Put spreads have limited risk and reward, and are more profitable as the underlying asset falls.

Bid – The price the trader sells at and the price that market makers and floor traders are willing to buy at. The Bid stands for the price at which the market maker will bid for your stock (or options or other instrument).

Bid Ask Spread – The difference between the bid and asked prices. Generally you will buy at the Ask and sell at the Bid. The Ask is always higher than the Bid.

Breakeven – The point(s) at which a risk profile of a trade equals zero.

Breakout – Where a price chart emerges upwards beyond previous price resistance.

Broker – A person who charges commission for executing a transaction (buy or sell) order.

Bull – Someone who expects the market to rise.

Bull Call Ladder – A spread using only calls where the trader buys a lower strike call and sells a higher strike call and another higher strike call.

Bull Call Spread – Long-term bullish strategy involving buying low strike calls and selling the same number of higher strike calls with the same expiration date.

Bull Market – A rising market over a period of time (usually a few years).

Bull Put Ladder – A spread using puts where the trader buys a lower strike put and sells a higher strike put and another higher strike put.

Bull Put Spread – Short-term bullish strategy involving buying lower strike puts and selling higher strike puts with the same expiration date.

Butterfly Spread – Three-legged direction neutral low volatility strategies involving either all call legs or all put legs. Suitable for rangebound stocks.

Buy on Close – An order stipulating to buy the security at the close of the trading session.

Buy on Open – An order stipulating to buy the security at the opening of the trading session.

Buy Stop – A buy order where the price stipulated is higher than the current price.The rationale here is that the buyer believes that if the security breaks a certain resistance then the security will continue to rise.

Buy-Write – A bullish strategy involving buying a stock and selling near term ATM or OTM call options to generate regular income. See “Covered Call.”

Calendar Spread – Two-legged option trade involving buying a long-term option and selling a shorter-term option with the same strike price. A Calendar Spread must involve either all call or all put legs; you cannot mix calls and puts together for this strategy.

Call Option – The right, not the obligation, to buy an underlying security at a fixed price before a predetermined date.

Call Premium – The price of a call option.

Call Ratio Backspread – Bullish strategy involving selling one or two lower strike calls and buying two or three higher strike calls.

Capital Gain – The profit realized from buying and selling an asset.

Capital Loss – The loss taken from buying and selling an asset unprofitably.

Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE) – The largest equity options exchange in the world.

Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) – The oldest commodity exchange in the U.S. Known for listings in T-bonds, notes, and a variety of commodities.

Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) – An exchange in which many types of futures contracts are traded in an open outcry system.

Class of Options – Options of the same type, style, and underlying security.

Clearing House – A separate institution to establish timely payment and delivery of securities.

Close – The last price quoted for the day.

Closing Purchase – A transaction that closes an open short position.

Collar – A low-risk bullish strategy involving buying a stock, buying near the money puts, and selling out of the money calls.

Closing Sale – A transaction that closes an open long position.

Commission – A charge made by the broker for arranging the transaction.

Commodity – A tangible good that is traded on an exchange—for example, oil, grains, metals.

Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) – An institution charged with ensuring the efficient operation of the futures markets.

Condor Spread – Four-legged direction neutral low volatility strategy involving either all call legs or all put legs. Suitable for rangebound stocks.

Contract – A unit of trading for an option or future.

Correction – A post-rise decline in a stock price or market.

Covered Call – A bullish strategy involving buying or owning a stock and selling near term ATM or OTM calls to generate regular income. See “Buy-Write.”

Covered Put – A bearish strategy involving shorting stock and shorting a near term put option to create regular income. Considered a high-risk strategy.

Covered Short Straddle – A bullish strategy involving buying (or owning) a stock and selling near term puts and calls at the same strike price and expiration date. This is a risky strategy, involving almost certain exercise of the put or call and a significant downside risk if the stock price falls.

Covered Short Strangle – A bullish strategy involving buying (or owning) a stock and selling near-term OTM puts and OTM calls at the same expiration date. This is a risky strategy, involving significant downside risk if the stock price falls.

Credit Spread – Where the simultaneous buying and selling of options creates a net credit into your account (i.e., you receive more for the ones you sell than those you buy).

Day Order – An order good for the day only.

Day Trade – The acquisition and disposal of an asset in the same day.

Day Trading – A trading style where positions are closed by the end of every day.

Debit Spread – Where the simultaneous buying and selling of options creates a net debit from your account (i.e., you pay more for the ones you buy than those you sell).

Deep In the Money (DITM) – calls Where the price of the underlying security is far greater than the Call Strike Price.

Deep In the Money (DITM) – puts Where the price of the underlying security is far less than the Put Strike Price.

Delayed Time Quotes – Quotes that are delayed from real time.

Delta – The amount by which an option premium moves divided by the dollar-fordollar movement in the underlying asset.

Delta Hedge – A strategy designed to protect the investor against directional price changes in the underlying asset by engineering the overall position Delta to zero.

Delta Neutral – Where a spread position is engineered so that the overall position Delta is zero.

Derivative – A financial instrument whose value is “derived” in some way from the value of an underlying asset source.

Diagonal Spread – Two-legged option trade involving buying a long-term option and selling a shorter-term option with a higher strike price. ACalendar Spread must involve either all call or all put legs; you cannot mix calls and puts together for this strategy.

Discount Brokers – Low commission brokers who simply place orders and do not provide advisory services.

Dividend – A payment made by an organization to its owners (shareholders), hopefully from profits.

Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) – An index of 30 blue chip stocks traded on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). This index is often considered a bellwether of overall market sentiment.

Downside Risk – The potential risk of a trade if prices decline.

End of Day – The close of the trading day when prices settle.


EPS
 – Earnings per share. The amount of profits of an organization divided by the number of outstanding shares.

Equity Options – Same as Stock Options.

European Style Option – An option that cannot be exercised before the expiration date.

Exchange – Where an asset or derivative is traded.

Exchange Rate – The price at which one currency can be converted into another currency.

Execution – The process of completing an order to trade a security.

Exercise – The activation of the right to buy or sell the underlying security.

Exercise (Strike) Price – The price at which an asset can be bought or sold by the buyer of a call or put option.

Expiration – The date at which the option’s ability to be exercised ceases.

Expiration Date – The last day on which an option can be exercised.

Extrinsic Value (Time Value) – The price of an option less its intrinsic value. Out of the Money Options are entirely made up of Extrinsic (or Time) Value.

Fair Market Value – An asset’s value under normal circumstances.

Fair Value – The theoretical value calculation of an option using a pricing technique such as Black-Scholes options pricing formula.

Fill – An order that has been executed.

Fill Order – An order that must be filled immediately or cancelled.

Fill or Kill – An order where a precise number of contracts must be filled or the order is cancelled.

Floor Broker – A member of an exchange who is paid to execute orders.

Floor Trader – An exchange member who trades on the floor of the exchange for his or her own account.

Fundamental Analysis – Analysis of a stock security that is based on the ability of the organization to generate profits for its shareholders. Such analysis embraces earnings, PE Ratios, EPS, Net Assets, Liabilities, customers, etc.

Futures Contracts Agreement – to buy or sell an underlying security at a predetermined date at an agreed price. The difference between futures and options is that with options, the buyer has the right, not the obligation. With futures, both parties are obliged to fulfill their part of the bargain.

Gamma – The speed by which Delta changes compared with the speed by which the underlying asset is moving.

Good till Cancelled Order (GTC) – An order that continues until either it is filled or cancelled specifically by the trader.

Guts – A volatility strategy involving buying In the Money (ITM) calls and ITM puts. High volatility is required after the position is opened to make this a profitable strategy.

Hedge – A term for reducing the risk of one position by taking other positions with options, futures, or other derivatives.

Historical Volatility – A measure of the price fluctuation of an asset averaged out over a period of time. A typical and popular period would be 21–23 trading days.

Index – A group of assets (often in a similar class of sector or market capitalization) that can be traded as a single security.

Index Options – Options on the indexes of stocks or other securities.

Interest Rates – The rate at which borrowed money is charged by the lender, usually annualized into a percentage figure.

In the Money (ITM) – Where you can exercise an option for a profit. In the Money (ITM) calls ITM calls are where the current stock price is greater than the Call Strike Price. In the Money (ITM) puts ITM puts are where the current stock price is less than the Put Strike Price.

Intrinsic Value – The amount by which an option is in the money.

Iron Butterfly – See “Long Iron Butterfly” or “Short Iron Butterfly.”

LEAPs – Long-term Equity AnticiPation Securities. These are long-term stock options with expirations up to three years in the future. LEAPs are available in callsand puts and are American-style traded options.

Leg – One side or component of a spread.

Leg In/Leg Out – Legging into a spread entails the completion of just one part of a spread with the intention of completing the other parts at more favorable prices later on. Legging out of a spread entails the opposite, whereby you exit your spread one part at a time with the intention of doing so at more favorable prices as the underlying security moves in the anticipated direction.

LIFFE – London International Financial Futures and Options Exchange. Now known as Euronext.liffe.

Limit Order – An order to buy at a set price that is at or below the current price of the security. An order to sell at a set price that is at or above the current price of the security.

Liquidity – The speed and ease with which an asset can be traded. Cash has the most liquidity of all assets, whereas property (real estate) is one of the most illiquid assets. Volume is the measure of liquidity for stocks, and Open Interest is the me
asure of liquidity for options. See Open Interest.

Long – Being long means that you are a buyer of a security.

Long Call – Buying a call option.

Long Call Butterfly – A three-leg direction neutral strategy requiring low volatility,involving buying a low strike call, selling two middle strike calls with the same strike price, and buying a higher strike call.

Long Call Condor – A four-leg direction neutral strategy requiring low volatility, involving buying a low strike call, selling two middle strike calls with different strike prices, and buying a higher strike call.

Long Call Synthetic Straddle – A two-leg direction neutral strategy requiring high volatility, involving buying two ATM calls for every 100 shares (U.S. stock options) sold, thereby replicating the risk profile of a Long Straddle.

Long Combo – A bullish strategy involving selling OTM puts and buying OTM calls in order to partially replicate a long stock position.

Long Iron Butterfly – A direction neutral strategy constructed by combining a Bull Put Spread with a Bear Call Spread or by combining a narrow Short Strangle with a wider Long Strangle.

Long Put – A bearish strategy, buying put options.

Long Put Butterfly – A three-leg direction neutral strategy requiring low volatility,involving buying a low strike put, selling two middle strike puts with the same strike price, and buying a higher strike put.

Long Put Condor – A four-leg direction neutral strategy requiring low volatility,involving buying a low strike put, selling two middle strike puts with different strike prices, and buying a higher strike put.

Long Put Synthetic Straddle – A two-leg direction neutral strategy requiring high volatility, involving buying two ATM puts for every 100 shares (U.S. stock options) bought, thereby replicating the risk profile of a Long Straddle.

Long Stock – Buying shares.

Long Synthetic Future – Buying calls and selling the same amount of puts with the same strike and expiration date, effectively forming the same risk profile of buying a stock but with almost no cost.

Margin – An amount paid by the account holder (either in cash or “marginable securities”)that is held by the brokerage against non-cash or high-risk investments, or where the brokerage has lent the account holder the means to undertake a particular trade.

Market Capitalization – The number of outstanding shares multiplied by the value per share.

Market if Touched (MIT) Order – An order that becomes a market order if the price specified is reached.

Market Maker – A trader or trading firm that buys and sells securities in a market in order to facilitate trading. Market makers make a two-sided (bid and ask) market.

Market on Close – Order An order that requires the broker to achieve the best price at the close or in the last five minutes of trading.

Market on Open – Order An order that must be executed at the opening of trading.

Market Order – Trading securities immediately at the best market prices in order to guarantee execution.

Market Price – The most recent transaction price.

Married Put – See “Covered Put.”

Modified Call Butterfly – A neutral to bullish strategy similar to a Long Call Butterfly, except that the OTM bought calls have a strike price nearer to the central strike price of the sold calls.

Modified Put Butterfly – A neutral to bullish strategy similar to a Long Put Butterfly, except that the ITM bought puts have a strike price nearer to the central strike price of the sold puts.

Naked Selling – Naked options refers to a sold options contract with no hedge position in place. Such a position leaves the option seller (writer) exposed to unlimited risk.

NASDAQ – National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations system.This is a computerized system providing brokers and dealers with securities price quotes.

Near the Money (NTM) – Where the underlying asset price is close to the Strike Price of an option.

New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) – The largest stock exchange in the U.S.

OEX – Standard & Poor’s 100 Stock Index.

Offer – The lowest price at which someone is willing to sell. You also can refer to the “Ask” of a Bid-Ask Spread. See “Ask.”

On the Money (At the Money) – See “ATM (At the Money).”

Open Interest – The total number of options or futures contracts that are not closed or delivered on a particular day. This is a measure of an option’s liquidity. A higher number of “open” contracts indicates greater liquidity. Greater liquidity affords us greater efficiency in closing our open positions.

Open Outcry – Verbal system of floor trading still used at many exchanges (e.g., the CME and CBOT).

Opening – The beginning of the trading session at an exchange.

Opportunity Cost – The risk of an investment expressed as a comparison with another competing investment.

Option – A security that gives the buyer the right, not the obligation, to buy (call) or sell (put) an underlying asset at a fixed price before a predetermined date.

Option Premium – The price of an option.

Option Writer – The seller of an option (usually naked).

Out of the Money (OTM) – Where the option has no intrinsic value and where you cannot exercise an option for a profit. Out of the Money (OTM) calls OTM calls are where the current stock price is less than the Call Strike Price. Out of the Money (OTM) puts OTM puts are where the current stock price is greater than the Put Strike Price.

Position Delta – The sum of all positive and negative Deltas within a hedged trade position.

Premium – The price of an option.

Price Bar – The visual representation of a securities price fluctuation for a set period of time. Price bars can be for as little as one minute (or less) and as much as one year(or more).

Put Calendar – A neutral to bullish strategy involving buying longer expiration puts and selling shorter expiration puts with the same strike price.

Put Diagonal – A neutral to bullish strategy involving buying longer expiration puts and selling shorter expiration puts with a higher strike price.

Put Option – The right, not the obligation, to sell an underlying security at a fixed price before a predetermined date.

Put Ratio Backspread – Bearish strategy involving selling one or two higher strike puts and buying two or three lower strike puts.

Quote – The price being bid or offered by a market maker for a security.

Ratio Backspread – A strategy using all puts or all calls, whereby the trader buys OTM options in a ratio of 3:2 or 2:1 to the ITM options he sells. In this way, the trader is always long in more options than those he is short in.

Ratio Call Spread – A bearish strategy that involves the trader being short in more options than those he is long in, at a ratio of 3:2 or 2:1. In this way, the trader will have an unlimited risk profile with only limited profit potential.

Ratio Put Spread – A bullish strategy that involves the trader being short in more options than those he is long in, at a ratio of 3:2 or 2:1. In this way, the trader will have an unlimited risk profile with only limited profit potential.

Real Time – Data that is updated and received tick by tick.

Resistance – A price threshold on a price chart that is thought to be difficult for the price to burst up through because of past price movements.

Return – The income profit on an investment, often expressed as a percentage.

Rho – The sensitivity of an option price to interest rates. Typically, call options increase in value as interest rates rise, and puts decrease in value as interest rates rise.

Risk – The potential loss of a trade.

Risk-Free Rate – The interest chargeable on Treasury Bills (T-Bills) is generally known as the Risk-Free Rate; this rate is used as a component part of the theoretical valuation of options model.

Risk Profile – The graphic depiction of a trade, showing the potential risk, reward, and breakeven points as the underlying security price deviates within a range of prices.

Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) – Organization that regulates the securities markets in order to protect investors.

Security – An instrument that can be traded—e.g., stocks, bonds, etc.

Selling Short – Selling a security that you don’t actually own beforehand. You will eventually have to buy it back, hopefully at a reduced price, thus making profit.

Series (Options) – Option contracts of the same class (underlying asset), same strike price, and same expiration date.

Shares – Units of ownership in a company or organization.

Short Selling – a security that you don’t actually own.

Short Call – A bearish strategy involving the short selling of call options.

Short Call Butterfly – A three-leg direction neutral strategy requiring high volatility, involving selling a low strike call, buying two middle strike calls with the same strike price, and buying a higher strike call.

Short Call Condor – A four-leg direction neutral strategy requiring high volatility, involving selling a low strike call, buying two middle strike calls with different strike prices, and buying a higher strike call.

Short Call Synthetic Straddle – A two-leg direction neutral strategy requiring low volatility, involving selling two ATM calls for every 100 shares (U.S. stock options) bought, thereby replicating the risk profile of a Short Straddle.

Short Combo – A bearish strategy involving buying OTM puts and selling OTM calls in order to partially replicate a short stock position.

Short Guts – Alow volatility strategy involving selling In the Money (ITM) calls and ITM puts. Low volatility is required after the position is opened to make this a profitable strategy.

Short Iron Butterfly – A direction neutral strategy constructed by combining a Bull Call Spread with a Bear Put Spread or by combining a narrow Long Strangle with a wider Short Strangle.

Short Put – A bullish strategy, selling put options usually OTM (with a strike price below the current stock price).

Short Put Butterfly – A three-leg direction neutral strategy requiring high volatility, involving selling a low strike put, buying two middle strike puts with the same strike price, and selling a higher strike put.

Short Put Condor – A four-leg direction neutral strategy requiring high volatility, involving selling a low strike put, buying two middle strike puts with different strike prices, and selling a higher strike put.

Short Put Synthetic Straddle – A two-leg direction neutral strategy requiring low volatility, involving selling two ATM puts for every 100 shares (U.S. stock options) sold, thereby replicating the risk profile of a Short Straddle.

Short Stock – Selling shares short.

Short Straddle – A low volatility direction neutral trade that involves simultaneously selling a call and put at the same strike price and with the same expiration date. Requires the underlying asset to be rangebound to make the trade profitable.

Short Strangle – A low volatility direction neutral trade that involves simultaneously selling a call and put at different strike prices (the put strike being lower than the call strike—i.e., both OTM) and with the same expiration date. Requires the underlying asset to be rangebound in order to make the trade profitable.

Short Synthetic Future – Selling calls and buying the same amount of puts with the same strike and expiration date, effectively forming the same risk profile of shorting a stock but with no net credit.

Short Selling – Selling a security that you don’t actually own beforehand. You will eventually have to buy it back, hopefully at a reduced price, thus making profit.

Sigma – Generally a term used to represent volatility. It is generally represented as a percentage. The term “one sigma level” refers to the actual change in the underlying asset price.

Small-Cap Stocks – Smaller (and sometimes newer) companies that are associated with high risk and high potential rewards. Can be illiquid to trade with large bid-ask spreads.

Speculator – A trader who aims to make profit by correctly assessing the direction of price movement of the security. Generally distinguished from investors in that speculators are associated with short-term directional trading.

Spread – The difference between the bid and ask of a traded security. Also, a trading strategy that involves more than one leg to create a (hedged) position. Aprice spread is the difference between the high and the low of a price bar.

Stock – A share of a company’s stock is a unit of ownership in that company.

Stock Exchange or Stock Market – An organized market where buyers and sellers are brought together to trade stocks.

Stock Split – Where a company increases the amount of outstanding stock, thus increasing the number of shares, reducing the value per share. Generally a sign that the stock has been rising and management’s way of assisting the liquidity in the stock.

Stop Orders – Buy Stops: where the order price is specified above the current value of the security. Sell Stops: where the order price is specified below the current value of the security.

Straddle – A neutral trade that involves simultaneously buying a call and put at the same strike price and with the same expiration date. Requires the underlying asset to move in an explosive nature (in either direction) in order to make the trade profitable.

Strangle – A neutral trade that involves simultaneously buying a call and put at different strike prices (the Put Strike being lower than the Call Strike—i.e., both OTM) and with the same expiration date. Requires the underlying asset to move in an explosive nature (in either direction) in order to make the trade profitable.

Strap – A neutral to bullish trade that involves simultaneously buying two calls and a put with the same strike price and expiration date. Requires the underlying asset to move in an explosive nature (preferably upwards) in order to make the trade profitable.

Strike Price (Exercise Price) – The price at which an asset can be bought or sold by the buyer of a call or put option.

Strip – A neutral to bearish trade that involves simultaneously buying two puts and a call with the same strike price and expiration date. Requires the underlying asset to move in an explosive nature (preferably downwards) in order to make the trade profitable.

Support – A price threshold on a price chart that is thought to be difficult for the price to fall through because of past price movements.

Synthetic Call – Buying a share and a put, or going long a future and a put, replicating the risk profile shape of a Long Call.

Synthetic Put – Buying a call and shorting a stock or future, replicating the risk profile shape of a Long Put.

Synthetic Long Stock – Buying a call and shorting a put with the same strike and expiration date.

Synthetic Short Call – Shorting a put and shorting a stock or future.

Synthetic Short Put – Shorting a call and buying a stock or future.

Synthetic Short Stock – Shorting a call and buying a put with the same strike and expiration date.

Synthetic Straddle – Combining stocks (or futures) with options to create a delta neutral trade.

Technical Analysis – Using charts, charting techniques, and indicators
(such as prices, volume, moving averages, stochastics, etc.) to evaluate likely future price movement.

Theoretical Value (Options) – The fair value calculation of an option using a pricing technique such as Black-Scholes options pricing formula.

Theta (Decay) – The sensitivity of an option price to the variable of time. Remember that options only have a finite life (until expiration), so Theta is an extremely important sensitivity to consider.

Tick – The least amount of price movement recorded in a security. Before decimalization, the lowest was 1/32 of a dollar.

Time Premium – The non-intrinsic component of the price of an option.

Time Value (Extrinsic Value) – The price of an option less its intrinsic value. Out of the Money and At the Money options are entirely made up of Extrinsic (or Time) Value.

Trading Plan – The step-by-step process in which you select your chosen securities, define your entry and exit points, and execute your strategy. No trade should ever be made without a proper trading plan in place. Your trading plan is like a business plan for each trading decision.

Triple Witching Day – The third Friday in March, June, September, and December when U.S. stock options, index options, and futures contracts all expire at the same time. The effect of this is often increased volume and volatility as traders look to close short and long positions.

Type – The classification of an option—either a call or a put.

Uncovered Option – A short position where the writer does not have the underlying security (or call option) to hedge the unlimited risk position of his naked position.

Underlying Asset/Instrument/Security – An asset that is subject to purchase or disposal upon exercise.

Upside – The potential for a price to increase.

Vega – The sensitivity of an option price to volatility. Typically, options increase in value during periods of high volatility.

Volatility – The measure of the fluctuation in the price movement in a security over a period of time. Volatility is one of the most important components in the theoretical valuation of an option price. Historical Volatility: the standard deviation of the underlying security (closing) price movement over a period of time (typically 21–23 days). Implied Volatility: the calculated component derived from the option price when using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing model. If there is a significant discrepancy between Implied and Historical Volatility, then there is the opportunity for the trader to take advantage of it.

Volatility Skew – Whereby deep OTM options tend to have higher Implied Volatilities than ATM options. When there are discrepancies, the trader can make trades whose profits are determined by volatility action as opposed to directional price action.

Volume – The number of underlying securities traded on their particular part of the exchange. Where price direction and volume bars are aligned in the same direction, then this is a bullish sign (i.e., it means that prices are rising with increased volume or that prices are falling with decreased volume). Where price direction diverges from volume bars, then this is a bearish sign (i.e., prices rising with falling volume or prices falling with rising volume).

Whipsaw – Where a price swing ensures a losing scenario for both sides of a position.

Witching Day – When two or more classes of options and futures contracts expire.

Writer – Someone who sells an option.

Yield – The rate of return of an investment, expressed as a percentage.

Zeta – An option price’s sensitivity to Implied Volatility.

Andrew Keene's Trading Rules


Top 10 Trading Rules:

1. Always trade with the trend; get long strong stocks & short weak stocks.
2. Always follow your own plan and never veer from it.
3. Never take trades or ideas from others; as Cramer says, “tips are for waiters”.
4. Do not over-trade; commissions can kill your P & L.
5. Don’t be afraid to be ‘flat’ if news or market is uncertain.
6. Don’t be an emotional trader; if you have been in a fight, are hungover, or are extremely tired, DO NOT TRADE!
7. Do keep a journal of trades that have been a. Profitable, b. Unprofitable and, c. Commission Killers.
8. Never add to a losing trade.
9. Always know the levels where you will take your profits or trash a trade.
10. Always know your max loss or gain for any given trade; risk vs reward.

Top 10 Trading Rules for Equity Options

1. Never sell an option naked; always have protection somewhere.
2. Don’t trade merger or acquisition deals.
3. Don’t trade against trend, if so make positions small & tight. Trade risk $0.80 to make $1 but the other way is fine.
4. Always use previous highs, lows, resistance, and support levels to find levels to get long/short.
5. Never have positions so big that you can’t sleep at night. Traders need sleep!
6. Sell weak stocks on strength and buy strong stocks on weakness.
7. Never risk more than 3% of your total capital on any single position.
8. Never be one-sided, too long, too short, long too much premium, or short too much premium.
9. Never lose more than 2% of your total portfolio in one day.
10. Always define risk vs. reward levels. Exit on profitable/unprofitable trades.

Top 10 Reasons to Trade Equity Options

1. Hedge a stock position (buy puts for protection, sell calls to create dividend yield)
2. Be your own boss (make money from comfort of own home)
3. Make your own schedule (choose hours, vacation time, when to work)
4. Massive leverage (Make huge profits in small movements in options and stocks)
5. Tons of cash to be made (Make more money in an hour, day, or year than most people will make in their lifetime)
6. Limiting Risk (Less gap risk and can always limit risk)
7. See results (Unlike other jobs actually see results and performance)
8. Reward uncapped (Risk a little to make a lot)
9. Make money in any market condition (Different option strategy can be profitable in any stock direction or lack of direction)
10. Low margin (Trade a big position on little amount of cash)

Top 10 Pitfalls of Options Trading

1.Always define risk vs reward
2.Follow BIG Money (Be on the trades with big money and watch profits grow)
3.Cover cheap options (If sell an option for $1 and goes to $.05 just cover it and move on)
4.Don’t sell naked options (no protection means blow-out risk)
5.Sometimes the best trade is no trade 
6.Never add to a losing trade
7.Countertrend Trading is Dangerous (If trading against the trend, trade smaller or smaller stops)
8.Premium kills (Owning too much premium, every day will cost money with no stock movement)
9.The TV Bandwagon (Never take a trade based on a TV anaylst)
10.Every trade is different (Some require more time, more movement, and more risk)

Top 10 Rules for Trading Psychology

1.Never add to a losing trade
2.Stay positive and confident
3.Past performance is not indicative of future results
4.Don’t ever get too emotional of a trade
5.Don’t blame others, only you control your trading account and P&L
6.Your only as good as your last trade
7.Never risk money you can’t afford to lose
8.Accepting a loser is the hardest part, but you will live to see another day.
9.Cut losses and add to winners
10.Always have a Gameplan and never vere from it.

Top 10 Ways I Became Profitable

1.Patience is a virtue, waiting for the right trade is just fine
2.Define risk vs reward, never risk money can’t afford to lose
     a.What am I willing to risk on this trade?
     b.Where is profit level  #1 #2 and #3
     c.If stock or option moves against me, where will I punt this trade.
3.Never add to a loser, I will never add to losing trade unless it is part of the Plan.
4.Don’t overtrade, it’s a commission buster. Trading is not cheap
5.Don’t get emotional, Not every trade will be a winner; moving on is important.
6.Stick with a winner. Always stick with the trend and if trading countertrend, trade smaller.
7.Technical levels work; moving averages, support, resistance are great indicators.
8.Caution during earnings, company announcements, and expiration.
9.Bet bigger when winner, smaller when losing. Scale back if not trading well.
10.Never play the: would have, could have, should have game. The trade is over, move on.